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% -- 10%, 20%, 40%. it is not too much to ask. we could see the economy and americans with some certainty. >> do you think the economy stays or goes down in little bits? do you believe the economy could withstand the effects of allowing the bush tax cuts to expire for all americans, even temporarily? >> that is not all of the discussion. the fiscal cliff would affect 27 million american families. there are other parts of this. when you hear about the fiscal cliff, it is not really the tax rate. i do not buy that at all. i do not think we need to increase these tax rates. >> if you go over and the tax rates go up on everyone and all that goes away -- >> i do not think we should do it. i think we should resolve this. it depends on if we do something about it in the next month or two after that. if we do something in 30 days or 90 days and we are clear about that, but nothing people believe we are going to do something until we do it. >> the to go to the broader concern. does the top rate have to end the 39.6% the way it was under bill clinton? could be democrats accept something between if
answer in today's economy" elizabeth ames, first of all, tell us about yourself and your personal experience, particularly when it comes to economics. >> i've been a finance journalist, but i've also been on both sides of the press release. so i started as a journalist and have my own pr business and they've also done projects, communication projects with clients. among them, co-authored the book. basically i were to steve forbes and conversations led to the idea for this book. >> how did you meet steve forbes? >> i met him at an event i did when i was working in southern california and one thing led to another. i moved back to new york. i am from new york and started working at "forbes" of the pr department. >> elizabeth ames, or practical experience, how do that that? >> i've learned a lot since "forbes." when i sat "forbes" islandwide about markets. again, i began as a journalist and worked at "businessweek" many years ago as a journalist. but when i started to work as an entrepreneur, i learned about the fact that you really need to have economic freedom to create jobs. someth
the economy. the central bank is widely expected to announce an extension of its bond buying program when it meets next week. erika miller, "n.b.r.," new york. >> tom: with the fiscal cliff about three weeks away, washington hasn't made much progress to avoid it. that was the assessment from one of those directly involved: house speaker john boehner. the top republican today accused president obama of, "slow walking", the economy to the edge of the cliff. he repeated his call for the president to send congress a plan that can pass both houses of congress. tax rates are the major sticking point. the president wants to raise them for america's highest earners, house republicans strongly oppose: >> instead of reforming the tax code and cutting spending, the president wants to raise tax rates. but even if the president got the tax rate hike that he wanted, understand that we would continue to see trillion dollar deficits for as far as the eye can see. washington's got a spending problem, not a revenue problem. >> tom: congress and the president have 24 days to reach a deal, before the fiscal
a tremendous opportunity to make sure that we hand off a thriving economy to our kids. i mentioned that it we were to run $600 billion deficit for the next 10 years, by the end of that, the debt -- it would lower our gdp forecasts. if we were to cut with the fiscal consolidations that $600 billion deficit to $300 billion, we would be buying future generations gdp growth in the long run. by about half a% per year. it is ultimately a question of what kind of world we want to live in 10 years from now. if you want to look like the way europe has been growing, we will have a small consolidation, such as the small consolidation proposed by the president. if you want to have the kind of growth that i hope we can have with a bigger consolidation, that one is being proposed by speaker boehner. >> thank you. >> i would like to focus on something that is probably more of interest to the economists and ordinary people. let's talk about ratios. what i heard you lay out, dr. zandi, was more of an ideal situation. they get you at roughly at $3 trillion. deficit-reduction over the course of 10 years. you we
balanced deficit reduction package that will do enormous good to our economy. and the kind of package that i should not leave out, that includes targeted investments so our economy continues to grow and create jobs. it would, as i said on a number of occasions, deficit reduction in an of itself is not a goal, it should be part of an economic plan is that is focused on economic growth and job creation. the president is very focus odden that. >> just a second ago, you referred to, when talking about the debt ceiling, taking it off the table, to be part of the deal. you referred to the economy being held hostage. you're aware that president obama voted against -- >> we addressed that. there was no threat of default at the time. what happened in 2011, as we all know because we all lived it, most of us in this room, was the threat of default, a willingness expressed by many to see the american economy under default and with all the consequent impacts on the global economy and on the american middle class. . in order to do that and was enormously damaging to consumer confidence.
implementations for the economy. cheryl: i can hear the hesitancy in your voice. a lot of our guests are saying the same thing. they are afraid of what washington will do or maybe not do. your outlook is a bit more bullish than some of your colleagues. what are you saying in the second half of 2013 that others are not? >> on a very short-term basis, we have noticed there are a couple of things. the fiscal cliff. we cannot get out of the way of that. if you look at to the second half of 2013 that we can get some resolution, we may not like the total resolution, but if we can, you move past a period of uncertainty. three things have started in 2012 that could accelerate in 2013. housing is key. cheryl: it has done incredibly well this year. >> the second aspect is what is going on with the energy field, in terms of technology and energy less dependence for the u.s. the third factor is what is going on in manufacturing. you can talk about the creation of jobs in the u.s. economy. if you can get the u.s. economy past this model through environment, you will see a slight acceleration in the second h
cuts and a weak economy. it is the lowest since 1950. to reverse the trend is a major breakthrough. yes, we are talking about deficit deduction. we are talking about raising revenue to a level in which can begin to support the kinds of investments we need to make to train our future work force and to create an environment in which we can care for the elderly. >> the think americans will remain optimistic but this did of the economy? if we have not tackle the things we have just talked about like the cost of education, the housing market? we are figuring out some philosophical issues about taxing and funding? >> i think the economy has been growing slowly and steadily all in the absence of any movement, which we have seen over the test of the last year. i have worked on guantanamo for the past 10 years. my sense is that if there is some movement until the positive direction, which have not seen out of washington and enter a long time, -- in a long time, at least we will not see head winds. we are making some progress. i see that continue. >> i want to come back to what todd said earlier.
and we had some growth in the economy, i don't think they would object to going back to the tax rates. >> with no breakthrough today, fiscal cliff negotiations, could this be a starting point? "outfront" republican congressman james lankford of oklahoma, incoming chairman of the republican policy committee, the fifth ranking position in the house gop leadership. appreciate you're taking the time. what about this idea of racing taxes on everyone? the math works much better. >> i heard your lead in when you said this is a new idea. actually, it's not a new idea, there are several democrats who have floated that for a while. the code word is we want to go back to the clinton tax rates and talk about the clinton economy that we had a much more vigorous economy and growth and we should go back to the clinton tax rates. what that really means is all tax rates on all americans go back up because the tax rates were brought down in 2001 and 2003. i don't support that. i don't think that's a great idea. it would slow down the economy. >> when you look at economist's evaluations, it would slow d
hurting our economy and creating jobs. today, the white house has demanded an offer from republicans. they now have one. back to you. llri: rich edson, and he thinks. the market is taking a breather today. dupont and 3m are the biggest draggers on the dow. early stocks rising out of the gate out of some good news out of china over the night. hitting a seven month high, but then the u.s. isf number hit at 10:00 a.m. eastern and a wave of selling. manufacturing activity contracted in november. they say the factory index came in at 49.5 in november. down from almost 52 and october. keep in mind, any number below 50 means contraction. above 50 equals expansion. investors are still worried about tax treatment and dead deals. exelon, the worst of the bunch our first guest has seen it all. the u.s. economy they fall into a recession next year even if congress strikes a budget deal by year end. joining us from stanford, california, martin feldstein. thank you for being with us. the republicans now responding. negotiations well underway to avoid a fiscal cliff. to your point, you recently sai
with the german economy and this is a big divergence. so that's a change. but looking over time, all stocks have the component of what they call the economic return. speculative return which is it for change and the valuation that the market puts on it. over time, one is a possum gain and the other is zero sum gain. sometimes good news, sometimes bad news. but over time the kind of net being nothing. >> we'll see what happens. good to have you on. we'll be out in westminster, joined by the british shadow business secretarier to. we'll talk currencies. find out why one strategist is bullish on the currency. after the ramp up in m&a that we've seen this year, we'll also speak to an expert in los angeles that says the fundamentalses for deal activity in 2013 are looking more solid. so where will the money flow in the new year, that's at 11:20. and the outlook for u.s. credit market appears less rose city. we'll speak to a moody's analyst that says high duration credit could be badly exposed. the european central bank is announcing either monetary policy decisions later today. economists expect ecb
the economy avoid the cliff and rides above? anyway, senior u.s. economist and managing director at ubs. do you think we'll get a deal? >> i think we'll get a deal. do we get it before the holidays or after for markets, it matters. it's been a drag for the last nine months. so the idea that there is more uncertainty now than there was six months ago, how does that work? there was no fiscal cliff deal six months from now and still no deal. so i'm not sure why we think there's more uncertainty. i would say if you really think about it the president has a lot of ways to delay the impact. for example, our withholding table don't have to get change order january 1. even if you haven't struck a deal, you don't adjust the withholding tables. for now you can delay the pain. so there is wiggle room in terms of when the impact has to be felt. >> but is there where wiggle rom the investing world who looks at the united states and says these guys are a bunch of keystone cops. this cost us with the last round of negotiations back in the summer of 2011 when the debt rating agencies said if you can't find
's the system, stupid. and we live and work in this system of political economy. america's operating system, if you will, that's delivering terrible results. i look at the international comparisons, for example, i've looked at the 20 leading democracies, the old oecd, and i looked at 30 key indicators of national well being and global citizenship, and i was startled, frankly, to find that the united states is at the bottom, the very bottom or next to the bottom on all 30 of these indicators of national performance. so it follows that if we want to change the direction the country's headed and build this attractive future for our children and grandchildren, we were going to have to change the system. we've got to drive this systemic, transformative change until we have, in effect, the new system of political economy, a new operating system for america, one that delivers good results for human and natural communities, but otherwise we've got to embed new and different priorities at the core of our political economy. and to do that, i think we've first got to understand what are the elements o
to the fiscal cliff that is threatening our economy and jobs the white house has wastde another week. secretary gitener came here to offer a plan that had twice the tax hikes that the president campaigned on and had more stimulus spending thanned the in cuts. and an indefinite increase in the debt limit like for ever. now four days ago we offered a serious proposal based on testimony of president clinton's former chief of staff. since then there has been no count offer from the white house. instead reports indicate that the president has adopted a deliberate stradgeji to slow walk our economy right to the edge of the fiscal cliff. instead of reforming the tax code and cutting spending, the president wants to raise tax rates. but even if the president got the tax rate hike that he wanted, understand that we would continue to see trillion dollar deficits for as far as the eye can see. washington has got a spending problem, not a revenue problem. if the president doesn't agree with our proposal, i believe he's got an obligation to families and small businesses to offer a plan of his own, a plan th
call cliff that's threatening our economy and threatening jobs, the white house has wasted another week. >> the phone call was pleasant, but was just more of the same. the conversations that the staff had yesterday, just more of the same. it's time for the president if he's serious to come back to us with a counteroffer. >> even though the president apparently designed the negotiating sessions at boehner's request. according to "the new york times," boehner insisted the talks include only himself and the president of the united states. boehner wanted senate democrats and nancy pelosi out of the discussions. democratic senator dick durbin told the times this is now the speaker and the president working this through. democratic leaders say they are satisfied with the briefings that they continue to receive. nancy pelosi seems perfectly happy putting pressure on the republicans. >> why are we not here to pass the middle income tax cut? why are we not here to even debate the middle income tax cut? could it be because the republicans have holding the middle income tax cuts as they have all a
this one and that is good for the american economy. >> we look back republican senator rand paul from the state of kentucky. senator paul, welcome, as always. i want to ask you about the fiscal cliff, the state of play. there's revenues on the table. there's tax rate increases on the table. i don't know if there's spending on the table. what's your thinking prigt now? >> that it's a really, really bad idea to raise taxes. if you want your economy to grow, you should do the opposite. we have to cut taxes. that's how i'd fix the economy. leave more money in the private sector. the president is adamant about raising taxes and he's dead wrong. >> there are some people saying we need a deal to avoid a huge tax increase but year end that would throw us into recession. just a thought, would you compromise in terms of let's say a smaller tax rate increase -- let's say the top rate goes to 37% instead of 40%, maybe the threshold goads es to $500,000 $750,000 rather than $250,000? does that interest you? >> no. but what about means testing for entitlement. why don't we say the rich get less soc
of an economy that way. i think both sides now are going to have to make some kind of compromise. the republicans have me a in mind because i have a small business. 35% -- all of the other taxes that become involved, that small company cannot exist. who's to say it will not go to 69.4%? when will it stop? thank you very much. host: i also want to get david in on the democrats' line. caller: good morning. thank you to suspend for taking my call. sometimes i feel like c-span has changed their name to r-span if you know what i mean. a lot of right wing things going on. i think you are not quite as biased as you used to be. i hope we do go over the fiscal glove. the reason being, -- go over the fiscal cliff. the reason being, all bush era tax cuts will expire. the senate has already passed the bill for the middle class tax cuts to continue. let the republicans in the house go ahead and fight for the 2% when all of the -- when all will go into effect. take the senate's version. i think they have been sitting on it for eight months in the house. i think it is terrible to treat the amer
it in a smart way that keeps our economy growing. earlier this year, congress extended the payroll tax cut through 2012. the two percentage point payroll tax cut has played an important role to sustain the recovery. boosting economic growth by an estimated 0.5% of one percentage point, and creating 400,000 jobs. we should continue the payroll tax cut through 2013, and yesterday i introduce legislation that would keep the employee payroll tax at 4.2% next year. to keep the economy growing -- there is good evidence of that in the last couple of months? job growth of about 511,000. to keep that momentum going, we should provide tax credits to small businesses. my legislation includes such an incentive for small businesses to grow. i am confident that congress will again be successful in reaching a compromise in the days ahead. i look forward to hearing today from the experts that we have before us today on how to reduce the deficit while protecting middle income families. as we enter the holiday season, americans should not have to face the uncertainty that many will face with regard to their
and the demand for oil -- actually, and the demand for oil continues to decline based on fuel economy standards and other reasons. and yet, with this revolution we still continue to have a problem. and i think the report that we're releasing today, the national strategy for energy security and its subtitle really says it all -- harnessing american resources innovation. and the first point is, how do we leverage this abundance we have in the united states to our maximum benefit? at a time when washington is talking about our fiscal crisis i'd say that the relationship of our oil needs to this crisis itself are close. it might not solve our fiscal crisis but clearly it's a necessary ingredient. every recession in the history of the united states in moden times has been preceded by or happening concurrent with an oil price spike. if we don't have continued growth we can cut all we want and raise revenue all we want, but we'll never find a way to solve our fiscal troubles. and i think this report really looks at how do we leverage this great abundance, this great blessing in the united states, both
. with just a few weeks ago before a potentially entirely avoidable blow to the economy, the president proposed a plan the members of his own party will even vote for. he is not interested in a balanced agreement, not particularly interested in avoiding the fiscal cliff, and clearly not interested at all in cutting any spending. with the president is really in, as we learned just yesterday, is getting as much taxpayer money as he can, first by raising taxes on small businesses who he believes are making too much money, and then on everybody else. not so he can lower the debt or the deficit, but so he can spend to his heart's content. for months, the president has been saying that all he wanted to raise taxes on the top 2% so he can tackle the debt and the deficit. however, yesterday, he finally revealed that that is not really is true intent. by demanding the power to raise the debt limit whenever he wants, by as much as he wants, he showed what he is really after is assuming unprecedented power to spend taxpayer dollars without any limit at all. this is not about getting a handle on d
think the ramifications for the economy are too significant. i think we're watching whatever you want to call it, all of the politics playing out, but i still think in the end we'll get a last minute deal. >> i agree. and i think even though the sides are far apart, you have things on the table now. so you can say you're here at 800, 1.6, you kind of -- it gets you somewhere close. somebody will try to say 1.3 versus 1.1, but if you see publicly what they're stating and hopefully privately other things are going on, but it will get done, but it will be very slow. >> john boehner with the proposal he put on the table, i did see commentary from some of the far right saying this is not an acceptable proposal. even his proposal is not acceptable. i did see comment it ter that came through. my question is does the president now have to alienate some of his far left base in order to reach a compromise. >> i think you'll see both of them have to actually bring the parties together. because you won't get everybody happy. some of the people who got voted on the ticket side, no, never. but it w
minutes away. count do countdown is on. the economy probably added about 80,000 jobs last month. reuters consensus is a little higher at 93,000. the unemployment rate expected to hold steady at 7.9% and economists say the slow down in nonfarm payrolls will reflect the effect of sandy. joining us this hour is bank of america merrill lynch global research senior research economist michelle mire and we'll talk through everything that's been happening through jobs and what to expect. but first, there is a developing story. an earthquake off the northeast coast of japan triggered a tsunami warning. the warning has been lifted, but it was a 7.3 quake. so far no reports of any injuries or damage. it was for the same area devastated by an earthquake and tsunami back in march of last year. we will continue to bring you any developments. in the meantime, steve has some of the morning's top other stories. >> let's start with the markets. asian stocks rallying to 2012 highs overnight. the nikkei edging lower after hitting a se hitting hitting a seven month closing high yesterday. european trading, s
until our economy falls off the tax and fiscal cliff. just where do we stand on a deal coming out of washington, d.c.? cnbc correspondent joins us with all the details. >> reporter: as you know the white house's strategy since the election has been to break republican resistance on two issues. one is tax rates and one is an increase in the debt limit. he hasn't succeeded or budged off that attempt so far which is why john boehner came out in a news conference today and slammed the white house for not being willing to compromise. >> four days ago we offered a serious proposal based on testimony of president clinton's former chief of staff. since then there's been no counter offer from the white house. instead, reports indicate that the president has adopted a deliberate strategy to slow walk or economy right to the edge of the fiscal cliff. >> a few hours later you had a slight indication of flexibility from the administration. vice president joe biden was out. he reiterated those two nonnegotiable demands on the part of the administration but said the actual amount of that top rat
, what does it mean to the economy? especially if we don't know in it will be a deal in a month or a deal to do deal in another year? >> there's absolutely no good at this point in pushing along the current system and waiting to fix it later. yeah, no one wants higher taxes, but we're not in a dp reception rightnow. we absolutely are going to die if things start to change and in fact, the underlying real problem, the growing deficit on the path to greece, the goalets worse once we kick the can away. that will be the overriding probleming not the slowing economy not people spending money, but sure, that might not happen in the first two months, but it will eventually happen if we keep kicking down the can. we want to prove to the world that we have a solution and if it takes a few months to get there and higher taxes for a while, big deal, we will get there. that's got to be the plan not just the same nonsense. >> yeah, but larry, that's part of your point, but jonas says we're not in a bad recession, we're certainly not in a good recovery. and if we just keep falling little bit by little
. ♪ ♪ with the best-in-class fuel economy. engineered to move heaven and earth. ♪ ♪ guts. glory. ram. romantic comedy or action? ahhh... i don't do or. or makes you choose. i want romaction. cyborg meets his baby mamma. waaa.. who wants or? i'm done with or. hit me! or...♪ huh...♪ yeah... ♪ what is it good for? ♪ ♪ absolutely nothing ♪ coke zero. real coke taste and zero calories. enjoy everything. >> tim: welcome back to "the jeep post-game show." tommy tuberville moving on to cincinnati today. which one of these hires surprised you the most? >> spencer: the tuberville, maybe it surprised some, the a.d. that hired him was with him at auburn bret bielema surprised me, won 62% hfs games. the issues with ohio state,y recruiting tactics probably encouraged him to leave. >> aaron: cincinnati with all due respect to cincinnati, they have problems with their facilities and some other things but i think cincinnati gets a great coach and a great replacement for butch jones. >> tim: hire of the year so far for me willie taggart, jim harbaugh disciple at south florida. he
to protect the top 2%. better to take the hit now, they argued, than in january with the world economy in turmoil and second recession coming. number two, john boehner, the speaker is claiming he's met obama's demand for higher taxes for the rich. that's good. he agreed in principle the rich must pay more. number three, there's talk for the republican leaders that they could vote to continue the tax cuts for the 98% now and therefore avoid the fiscal cliff and put off for now the top 2%. and the question then, let the debt ceiling not take effect. a tax cut delayed i argue is a tax cut avoided. joining me with the republican defense highly tauted fan of the eagles, ed rendell and alex wagner of msnbc's "now." governor, i want you to read what's going on here. first speaker boehner defended the gop's tax proposal saying it does take a bite out of the rich but president obama held firm to tax rate hike on the wealthiest. let's listen to the back and forth. >> revenues we're putting on the table are going to come from, guess who? the rich. there are ways to limit deductions, close loophol
. it tells us what we know which is we have an almost stagnant economy. >> what is ok and what is troubling? guest: we are seeing some job creation. it is surprising the number of jobs created was 146,000. going into it, economists expected it to be half of that for two reasons. one was sandy up a center of the northeast. that through a lot of businesses offline. the other was economists thought businesses were getting freaked out by fiscal cliff situation in washington and basically would not necessarily be firing people basically putting everything on hold. they would simply not be making hiring decisions. there is other data saying that is what businesses are doing, and yet we saw a number saying all the new jobs. that indicates there is more momentum summer in the economy. host: retail is at the head of the list with 53,000 jobs. is that because of christmas? guest: they tried to take seasonal jobs out of it. that is not necessarily because of the holiday season. it does show consumers are shopping. that is one of the things you expect to come back early in a recession. those are not al
again and we had some growth in the economy, i don't think they would object to going back to the tax rates that were there when i was predz. >> with now break through today and the fiscal cliff negotiations, is this a starting point? "outfront" republican congressman james langford of oklahoma, incoming chairman of the republican policy committee, the fifth ranking position in the house gop leadership. good to see you, sir. appreciate you taking the time. what about this idea of raising taxes on everyone? the math actually in this case is much more promising. it works much better. >> right. i heard your lead-in on it, and you said this is a new idea floated by howard dean. ints a new idea. several democrats have floated that a while. the code word is going back to the clinton tax rates and talk about the clinton economy and we should go back to the clinton tax rates. what that means is all tax rates on all americans go back up because the tax rates were brought down in 2001 and 2003. so it's not new, and no, i don't support that. i don't think that's a great idea at all. it will slow
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> woodruff: the economy added more jobs than expected in november, and the unemployment rate dropped to a four year low. good evening, i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight, paul solman breaks down the latest report. and we debate the benefits of extending unemployment insurance amid washington's fiscal uncertainty. >> woodruff: then we turn to the supreme court which agreed today to take up the issue of gay marriage. margaret warner looks at what's at stake with marcia coyle of "the national law journal." >> brown: hari sreenivasan reports on the threat to the shellfish industry from coast to coast, as ocean temperatures rise and the waters are more acidic. >> this is a very dramatic change that has not been seen in the worlds oceans for more than 50 million years. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: and gwen ifill sits down with michael beschloss, whose recent foray into the twitter-verse has opened up a new way to view history in the digital age
-- never rise above it, what does that say about our country? to me, it says our economy is failing to provide the basic security, much less rising wages. our schools are failing to provide a path out of poverty our families and communities are breaking down -- out of poverty. our families and communities are breaking down. our homes and neighborhoods. at a time of great consequence, the american people have chosen a divided government. it is up to us to make this divided government work. we have to set aside partisan concerns. how to work together to prepare this economy to get people back on their feet? how do we get this sense of real security and upper mobility for all americans, especially those in need? they are the same. the old ways will not do. we need new thinking and renewed efforts from all americans. it is true that president obama won reelection. i congratulate him on his victory. on january 20, he will face a a fiscal economy and and i mess. you might say he will inherit these problems. [laughter] [applause] he his second term, i hope t will offer fresh ideas. failure
of the economy right now. the idea that there is this diagnosis that, it is too bad you people are not employed, you people do not have the right skills, there is no evidence that is going on. host: jim on the republican line, from maine. caller: i thank unemployment is probably a good thing, but when you expanded too far, it put a really heavy burden on the employers. as one lady called in on the last segment, the state she was from is obviously much higher than made is, but when it gets to a point that your state system goes broke, they put fees on the employer, and they cannot afford to pay the rates. host: mr. tanner? guest: the unemployment tax is generally under 1% even when you include the match that goes into the extended benefits. we're already running in federal debt more than 100% of gdp. once you get over 60% to 70% of gdp, that begins to slow economic growth. we are costing jobs. that is because that money is -- players are looking down the road and saying they're going to have to pay more in the future. we simply cannot afford to spend money, especially we do not have, and still e
open the door for eorts and create a boom for the economy. the only thing standing the way though is present obama. we'll drill down with a natural gas company's ceo. >>> plus fighting crazy with crazy. could two plat nurm coins worth a trillion dollars each solve our debt crisis? is it as nuts as it sounds? bear with me here, people. our "money" power panel will break it down. >>> are plastic bags the way to extinction. they're completely banned in two cities. chicago wants to nix them. guess who is behind it? my favorite chicago alderman. i say stop the madness. but alderman joe moreno is here to disagree with me. even when they say it is a not it is always about money melissa: first let's take a look at today's market headlines. mediocrity apparently the reason to buy on wall street today. the november jobs report came in above expectations but the 146,000 jobs added is below average monthly growth for the past two years. that and 350,000 americans left the workforce. it all somehow added up to an 81-point gain on the dow. as usual the markets are making perfect sense. also mo
to the fiscal cliff that's threatening our economy and threatening jobs, the white house has wasted another week. >> we've had time. the president has given the republicans flexibility to come up with a credible, specific plan. what they offered in return was an empty letter lacking in specifics. >> meanwhile, vice president biden is having lunch with several middle class americans who would see their income taxes go up if the tax cuts are not extended. all of this comes as the first jobs report since the election exceeded expectations. the u.s. economy added some 146,000 jobs last month. that was enough it to drive the unemployment rate down to 7.7%. joining me to talk about all of it, florida congresswoman debbie wasserman schultz and she chairs the democratic national committee. good friday afternoon to you. >> thank you. >> john boehner said today that democrats' plan is to, quote, slow walk our economy to the edge of the fiscal cliff. how do you respond it to that? >> well, that's just utterly preposterous. the republicans right now in the house of representatives have a bill that would ext
than to stay in. won people drop out of the labor force they slow the economy. their productivity is gone, their contributions are no longer there, so this is a different situation we're facing today than we faced i really think since the end of the world war ii. >> brown: before the implication of the fiscal cliff,xplain it because different states have different impact. >> under normal economic times this say program that is governed by state law and administered by the state. and states pay up to 26 weeks of benefits, six months for people who lost jobs through no fault of their own. but if bad economic times historically congress has authorized additional levels of benefits. this time it is a program called the emergency unemployment compensation system. and there are four different tiers depending on how bad your state unemployment rate is every state gets 14 weeks. nine states get up to 47 a decisional weeks. and the rest are in betweenment but you have to be over 9% to get that additional 47 weeks. >> brown: so it is this program that is now caught up in the fiscal cliff ne
over the last four years, there is progress in some key sectors of our economy. we've seen housing finally begin to bounce back for the first time, and that obviously has an enormous ripple affect throughout the economy. consumer confidence is as high as it's been. many of you over the last two, three years have experienced record profits or near record profits and have a lot of money where you're prepared to invest in plants, and equipment, and hire folks. obviously globally the economy is still soft. europe is going to be in the doldrums for quite some time. asia is not charging forward and some of the emerging markets are not charging forward as quickly as they were maybe a few years ago. but i think what all of you recognize and many of you have told me is that everybody is looking to america, because they understand that if we're able to put forward a long-term agenda for growth and prosperity that is broad based here in the united states, that confidence will not just increase here in the united states, it will increase globe balance leave. globally and i think we can get the
market. it is just going to affect the economy the same as gas prices or food prices going up on the poor and middle class. life will go on. just like life has gone on for the rest of the united states of america. but right now, i think the state of politics is very sad because they're seen -- there seems to be more of a game to be played and positions, one party having the upper hand over the other. not much is going to get done. and you have too many extremes on each side to make things a lot more difficult to run. and it makes it difficult on the president as well. i'm optimistic that the president got reelected, but pessimistic on anything really changing. have leased, anytime soon. -- at least, any time soon. host: and talking about actual change, if there will be a difference on january 1st or otherwise, in terms of taxes, politics, the fiscal cliff, john mckinnon, are any of these expiring? as part of our fiscal cliff series, we're looking at the bush tax cuts that are set to expire unless congress acts, and we are looking at spending cuts. our deductions on the chopping block unle
will be blamed. remember, this is the obama era. it's going to go down as his economy. i ask people who was speaker of the house during the great depression when roosevelt was president. i'll give a hundred dollars to anyone who can name who the speaker of the house was in the critical first hundred days -- >> jim over there would know. >> henry thomas reigny. now, there's a name in the history books. point being, the speaker is an important player, this is significant, but it is obama's job to lead and define so if there's negative consequences here, particularly in the economy, it's going to be in the obama era, things didn't get fixed. who is it? the australian finance minister who says the united states is one budget deal away from being a great country. there's a lot of people in business who think we are poised to do some really good things in the global economy, the united states is, but if we can't untangle this mess, it's not going to happen. >> you know about the inner workings in the government more than any living person, every single administration of our lifetime. you've b
emerging economy. we asked about the report the government makes for business and enterprise. it is fair to say that his answer has captured the imagination of all political parties that will respond formally in the spring. so here's what we will do now. first, government spending should be alone with the business community. we will provide new money to support the partnerships. from april 2015, the governmental elites one of the funding and get people back to work. the gross funds are having businesses get back into the game. we are going to support businesses and technologies where britain has a clear technology advantage. we will extend our global lead in aerospace and support the supply chain for advanced infection. we've also support british companies to new emerging markets in asia and africa and the americas. and increasing the funding for the uk by over 25% a year. so they can help more firms build the capacity of overseas british chambers and maintain our country's position as the number one destination in europe for foreign investment. we are launching a new 1.5 billion pounds
is going to take a more, i would say rational approach to how to deal with their own economy and how they deal with their own people, and how they deal internationally. and so i think generally there's been a feeling that there might be some hope there. however, now we are approaching, once again, a potential violation of a u.n. security council resolution, and we encourage the leadership in north korea to consider what they are doing here and implications in the overall security environment on the korean peninsula, as well as destination. >> anything new? we been hearing some rumblings for some time that there might be some activity on that front. anything new that you can provide in terms of insights into launches or things like that? >> well, i think you're tracking a pretty well. i think from the media today there are indications declared indications of their intention to do what they would call a peaceful satellite launch. and we believe it is in contradictory to the u.n. security council resolutions, that because of the nature of the type of missile they will be firing and the
of the economy is for everyone to pay more in taxes and guarantee a form of public goods. the most successful democracy is where it is structured around universe albens where everyone pays in and makes use of what the state provides. now, no leaders are making that argument. in the short run, they are right not to. getting rid of the entirety of the bush tax cuts for all brackets hurts the recovery. once we are in the recovery, we have to do at least that and more. the question is, does the death of the consensus mean american voters are ready to hear that? how will this president or the next make the case? joining me today, governor of connecticut, a senior research fellow at george mason university. senior economic director at naacp and a fellow at the roosevelt institute. it's great to have you all here. i like when i do these spiels, listen to withering criticism from the panel. what do you think of the thesis, at least about the politics of the undoing of the consensus? >> i think this focus on grover is just it's wrong. i mean grover is just one guy advocating for a position that i thin
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